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Social Enterprise

How to Holiday and support Sustainable Capitalism!

How to Holiday and support Sustainable Capitalism!

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Overconsumption and the inefficient use of resources is a huge challenge going forward as the world moves towards a sustainable economy. The twelfth Sustainable Development Goal aims to achieve responsible production and consumption by achieving a sustainable balance between natural resource use and economic growth.

Sustainably harnessing the power of tourism

Tourism accounts for 10% of global GDP and around 30% of global exports. Improving the sustainability of tourism is therefore crucial to achieving the twelfth SDG.

Unfortunately, stories too often abound of environmental damage and scarcity caused by the overconsumption of local resources. Mass influxes of tourists can also erode local cultures. When these things occur, it damages local communities and threatens the beauty which draws visitors in the first place. 

In Nepal, tourism puts pressure on already scarce local resources in places like Kathmandu. Tourism also contributes to local waste management problems. Nowhere is this more evident than on Mount Everest, where up to 50 tonnes of rubbish has accumulated. 

Be part of the solution

Fortunately, by focusing on sustainable and responsible tourism, companies like Hands on Development are offering affordable travel experiences which support rather than burden local communities. 

Our smaller tour group sizes minimise the impact on the local environment and preserves the sanctity of local sights. Participants also have the opportunity to support and learn about sustainable local enterprises. By engaging in cooking, craft and language classes, tour participants learn about the local culture and support economic development, all in a respectful and sustainable manner.

By choosing to holiday with Hands on Development, you can enjoy unforgettable experiences while directly contributing to the transition to a more sustainable global economy and tourism industry. Not only will the planet and local communities win, but you yourself will have a more memorable and meaningful experience. 

A challenging opportunity

A challenging opportunity

 

The growth in international tourism provides an unprecedented opportunity for meaningful cultural exchange and economic development. However, if left unchecked, tourism can have adverse effects which detract from its positive potential. A paradigm shift towards responsible tourism is needed to best harness travel’s transformative ability. 

The numbers…

A quick look at the numbers illustrates just how massive the global tourism industry — and its growth potential — truly are. In 2017, tourist arrivals increased by 7% globally and are projected to rise by 4-5% throughout 2018. Moreover, tourism is currently the world’s fastest growing economic sector. 

Given these stats, it is not surprising that travel and tourism indirectly or directly supports at least 313 million jobs globally. As travel becomes even more affordable and the global middle class continues to expand over the next ten years, 100 million more jobs will be created.   

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The challenge

Of course, a surge in tourist numbers is not without its drawbacks. Mass tourism has the potential to cause environmental damage, ruin local cultures and sights as well as pushing up prices and creating economies centred around seasonal, low-paying jobs. 

Startlingly, despite these damaging impacts, only 5% of the money spent by tourists actually ends up staying in local economies. The tourism industry must also find a way to adapt to climate change. 

The solution

Fortunately, around the world, interest is growing in sustainable and responsible tourism — which focuses on minimising tourism’s footprint while also maximising economic benefits for locals. Responsible tourism also provides the basis for more meaningful experiences by emphasising genuine cross-cultural interactions.

Hands on Development — and its partner organisation Seven Women — are part of a global movement which seeks to truly transform tourism into a force for good. Profits from tours helps fund the training and employment of disadvantaged Nepali women, thereby ensuring that local communities tangibly benefit from tourism. Tour goers also have the opportunity to learn about Nepali cooking, crafts and language, while broadening their perspectives on a variety of global issues.

If you want to create positive global change, choose Hands On for your next holiday!

 

 

Eliminating poverty whilst travelling

Eliminating poverty whilst travelling

While tourism has a huge potential to lift entire populations out of poverty, currently only 5% of the revenue from tourism stays within local communities. Solely profit-driven tourism can also have adverse impacts on local communities. Through travelling with Hands on Development, you can ensure that you travel responsibly and help reduce poverty in Nepal.

What is Responsible Tourism?

In short, responsible tourism minimises the negative effects of unsustainable travel while creating economic benefits for local people and facilitating meaningful cultural exchanges. For obvious reasons, responsible tourism therefore has the ability to support the realisation of the first SDG, which aims to eradicate extreme poverty by 2030 — with a particular focus on supporting marginalised groups such as women and the disabled. 

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How you can make a difference

So how can you travel responsibly while supporting the SDGs? Hands on Development run ethical tours to Nepal with a particular focus on social, financial and environmental sustainability. By going on a tour with Hands on Development, you can directly help economically empower marginalised communities in Nepal. 

Specifically, Hands on Development employs local women as tour guides, allowing them to achieve financial independence. As part of the tour, participants will engage in genuine cultural exchanges by participating in Nepali, craft and cooking classes. In turn, the profits from these classes help to fund the training and employment pathways of disabled and marginalised women who are often denied the opportunity to work. The tour also visits and directly supports various local enterprises, such as the craft business run out of Seven Women’s headquarters in Kathmandu.

So, next time you’re looking to get away, holiday with a difference and directly support poverty reduction by choosing to travel with Hands on Development!